2013 Michigan QSO Party

Multi-Operator Stations

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Michigan Single Transmitter

Call

Cty

QSOs Mults Score

 Club

N8SL

OAKL

700

206

214,652

South Lyon Area ARC 

N8KV

LEEL

778

186

194,370

Cherryland ARC

N9FN

KZOO

572

184

159,344

Society of Midwest Contesters 

At the top of the Michigan Multi-Operator, Single-Transmitter competition, we have a group from the South Lyon Area ARC running under their club callsign N8SL from the QTH of W8RA in Oakland county.  Running two rigs, they had band breakdowns of 154/389/158 that slightly favored phone (51%), but came up about 13K short of the K8MQP multi-single record from 2012.  Their best rate came in the 16Z and 22Z hours with 70 QSOs each.  They operated the entire contest while running high power and worked 123 different multiplier entities including 68 different Michigan counties.

In second place, we have the same team who finished second last year operating as WD8S from Lake county, and that is N8KV running from the home QTH in Leelanau county.  Their battle with N8SL is an interesting tradeoff of QSOs vs. multipliers - N8KV had 78 more QSOs, but N8SL had 20 more multipliers and took the win by 20K, or about 10%.  N8KV had band breakdowns of 135/619/23/1/0, but had a higher percentage of phone QSOs (66%) than N8SL.  Their best hour of the contest tallied an excellent count of 111 QSOs in the 01Z hour followed by 110 QSOs in 02Z.  N8KV operated 11:11 of the contest while working 119 different multiplier entities including 68 different Michigan counties.

In third place multi-single, we have a familiar callsign - N9FN operated by "the two FNs", Dave/N9FN and Dave/K9FN in another of their portable operations, this time from Kalamazoo county.  N9FN's band breakdown was 121/395/56/0/0, with a very close CW/SSB QSO balance and a perfect balance in multipliers.  Their best hour of the contest for rate was 18Z, with 78 QSOs.  They operated the entire contest period while running high power and worked 116 unique multiplier entities along with 74 different Michigan counties.

The graph above shows the progress made by each of the top three multi-single entries as the contest ran on.  All three stations had similar starts for the first four hours. but then N8SL & N8KV opened a small gap on N9FN.  N8SL ran remarkably even QSOs rates for the entire contest, while N8KV hit a lull in the 23Z hour, only to find their big rates in the 01Z and 02Z hours to pull away at the end.

Michigan Multi Transmitter

Call

Cty

QSOs Mults Score

 Club

N8LC

HURO

684

189

193,347

 L'Anse Creuse ARC

K8UO

SANI

502

155

114,700

 Utica-Shelby Emergency Comm Assn

W8SH INGH 596 149 99,830  Mich State University ARC

With perennial multi-multi juggernaut K8XXX QRT in 2013, the multi-multi competition was wide open.  Into this breach jumped the crew from the L'Anse Creuse ARC, operating their club call N8LC from another portable operation in Huron county after a similar operation in 2012.  Compared to that effort, in 2013 this group scored 20K more points, and had band breakdowns of 185/366/133/0/0, almost evenly split between CW and phone.   Their best hour for rate was 01Z, with 93 QSOs. The group ran high power with three rigs, and operated the entire contest period, putting 115 unique multiplier entities along with 68 different Michigan counties into their log.

The second place multi-multi team was another club portable operation - K8UO from the Utica-Shelby Emergency Communications Association, operating from Sanilac county.  Their band breakdowns were 143/325/25/9, with 53% on phone.  K8UO ran high power with five operators but a 40 minute QRT in the 19Z hour kept them from operating the full contest period.   Nonetheless, they managed to put 107 unique multiplier entities and 22 different Michigan counties into their log.

In third place was a group stepping up from the multi-single wars, and that's W8SH, the Michigan State university ARC operating from Ingham county.  Their entry didn't provide much background for their operation, but their band breakdowns were 148/351/90/8 with 88% on SSB.  Despite having more QSOs than second place K8UO, the heavy emphasis on phone by W8SH earned them 10% less QSO points.  Also, while they had a very good phone mult count, their low count on CW put them behind in multipliers as well.  Surprisingly, their best hour of the contest was the last, with 78 QSOs.  This group ran high power and operated essentially the entire contest period, putting 111 unique multiplier entities and 65 different Michigan counties into their log.

The graph above shows the progress made by each of the top three multi-multi entries as the contest ran on.  K8UO grabbed a 32 QSO lead in the first hour which N8LC erased in the second.  K8UO's off time in the 19Z hour allowed N8LC to open up a gap between then and even allowed W8SH to sneak ahead.  K8UO and W8SH were neck-and-neck through the middle of the contest before W8SH ran off 77/59/78 rates in the last three hours.  Looking at the logs, it appears that N8LC made best use of their multiple transmitters and this is what got them the win.

Non-Michigan Multi Operator

Call

Loc

QSOs Mults Score

 Club

K9PG

IL

166

89

24,831

 Society of Midwest Contesters 

W2RR

NY

49

34

3,332

 Western NY DX Association 

KV1J

ME

38 31 1,736

 Yankee Clipper Contest Club

Even though being an out-of-state multi-op in a state QSO party might not be one's favorite way to spend a nice April weekend, in the 2013 we had a few ops who took a stab at it, lead by Paul Gentry, K9PG operating from Illinois.  The secret to Paul's success was his determination to stay in the chair and make QSOs.  Although he only operated 8:46 of the contest, he made QSOs during 11 of the 12 contest hours.  Contrast this with W2RR (2:57 op time, QSOs in 5 of the 12 contest hours, or KV1J (1:57 op time, QSOs in 5 of the 12 contest hours).  Paul made 78% of his QSOs on 40M with the rest on 80M; 68% of his QSOs were on CW. Another interesting fact is the 59 of Paul's 166 QSOs (35.5%) were with mobile stations. As referred to earlier, W2RR (operated by Lonnie, WA2AOG) and Eric, KV1J rounded out the top three.  All three stations used some form of assistance (thus their 'multi-op' status).  K9PG worked 60 MI counties and 60 unique multipliers.  Even though W2RR was QRT for the first six hours of the contest, he still worked 34 counties and 34 unique multipliers, all on CW.  And even though KV1J missed seven of the first weight hours of the contest, he still worked 23 MI counties and 23 unique multipliers, split about equally between phone and CW.

The graph above shows the progress made by each of the top three non-Michigan multi-op entries as the contest ran on.  Probably the most noticeable thing about this graph is that each station appears to have had different agendas, perhaps constrained by available time to operate.  After missing the first hour, K9PG made QSOs in each of the succeeding hours.  W2RR didn't make a QSO until 2249Z, but then started putting QSOs into his log at a consistent pace.   KV1J made 6 QSOs during the 18Z hour, but then didn't log another until 0019Z.  As we said; different agendas, different results.

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2013 MiQP Multi Operator Results